kris-bryantIchiro Suzuki tripled for his 3,000th hit. Jake Arrieta threw his second career no-hitter. Brandon Crawford had seven hits in 14 innings against the Marlins. Bartolo Colon, 42, became the oldest player in history to hit his first career home run. Vin Scully retired after 67 years as the Dodgers broadcaster. Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez died in a boating accident. He was 24.

The Cubs, Nationals and Giants dominate this year’s National League All-Star team with nine total selections, including all five spots in the starting rotation. The Cubs — who are the favorites to win their first pennant since 1945 and their first World Series since 1908 — and Nationals each earn two awards.

Babe Ruth Award (or Player of the Year) | Kris Bryant, Cubs. 39 home runs, 102 RBIs, .292 average, .385 on-base, .554 slugging, 121 runs, 18 HBPs, 32 win shares, 7.7 WAR. Bryant led the league in WAR and runs and had the two best games of the season: three home runs and two doubles on June 27 — becoming the ninth player since 1913 with five extra-base hits in a game — and five hits, including two home runs, on Aug. 18.

2. Corey Seager, Dodgers
3. Freddie Freeman, Atlanta
4. Anthony Rizzo, Cubs
5. Daniel Murphy, Nationals

Pee Wee Reese Award (or Teammate of the Year) | Daniel Murphy, Nationals. 25 home runs, 104 RBIs, .347 average, .390 on-base, .595 slugging, 47 doubles, 31 win shares, 4.6 WAR. Murphy is the type of player who sometimes wins the MVP award — a free agent signing who has a career year for an improved team. See Kirk Gibson (1988), Terry Pendleton (1991), Ichiro (2001) and Vladimir Guerrero (2004).

2. Ben Zobrist, Cubs
3. Bartolo Colon, Mets

Walter Johnson Award | Max Scherzer, Nationals. 20-7, 2.96 ERA, 284 strikeouts and 56 walks in 228.1 innings, 20 win shares, 6.2 WAR. A dominant season. Scherzer led the league in wins, innings, strikeouts and strikeout-to-walk ratio (5.1).

Jackie Robinson Award | Corey Seager, Dodgers. 26 home runs, 72 RBIs, .308 average, .365 on-base, .512 slugging, 105 runs, 40 doubles, 29 win shares, 6.1 WAR. The top rookies in the league were shortstops:

2. Aledmys Diaz, Cardinals
3. Trea Turner, Nationals

The Dodgers, with a record 16 Rookie of the Year award winners, are the only franchise that could field a team of them:

Catcher | Mike Piazza (1993)
First base | Eric Karros (1992)
Second base | Jim Gilliam (1953), Steve Sax (1982), Jim Lefebvre (1965), Ted Sizemore (1969)
Third base | Jackie Robinson (1947) 1
Shortstop | Corey Seager (2016)
Outfield | Raul Mondesi (1994), Frank Howard (1960), Todd Hollandsworth (1996)
Starting pitchers | Fernando Valenzuela (1981), Don Newcombe (1949), Hideo Nomo (1995), Rick Sutcliffe (1979)
Relievers | Joe Black (1952), Steve Howe (1980)

Connie Mack Award | Joe Maddon, Cubs. 103-58. The Cubs began the season 25-6 and won 100 games for the first time since 1935.

2. Dusty Baker, Nationals
3. Terry Collins, Mets

Catcher | Buster Posey, Giants. 14 home runs, 80 RBIs, .288 average, .362 on-base, .434 slugging 24 win shares, 4.7 WAR. Posey and the Giants are 9-0 in postseason series and 6-0 in elimination games. Tonight is another one. Best fielder | Posey

First base | Freddie Freeman, Atlanta. 34 home runs, 91 RBIs, .302 average, .400 on-base, .569 slugging, 102 runs, 43 doubles, 10 HBPs, 28 win shares, 6.5 WAR. Freeman hit .251/.338/.419 with eight home runs in April and May and then .327/.428/.641 with 26 home runs the rest of the season. He had a 30-game hitting streak and hit safely in 41 of 42 games. Best fielder | Anthony Rizzo, Cubs.

2. Anthony Rizzo, Cubs
3. Joey Votto, Reds
4. Paul Goldschmidt, Diamondbacks

Second base | Daniel Murphy, Nationals. 25 home runs, 104 RBIs, .347 average, .390 on-base, .595 slugging, 47 doubles, 31 win shares, 4.6 WAR. He led the league in slugging and doubles and came within one hit of the batting title. Best fielder | Josh Harrison, Pirates.

2. Jean Segura, Diamondbacks

Third base | Kris Bryant, Cubs. 39 home runs, 102 RBIs, .292 average, .385 on-base, .554 slugging, 121 runs, 18 HBPs, 32 win shares, 7.7 WAR. The best player in the league and the most versatile. Bryant started 100 games at third base, 36 in left field, 12 in right field, six at first base and one at DH. Best fielder | Nolan Arenado, Rockies.

2. Nolan Arenado, Rockies
3. Justin Turner, Dodgers

Shortstop | Corey Seager, Dodgers. 26 home runs, 72 RBIs, .308 average, .365 on-base, .512 slugging, 105 runs, 40 doubles, 29 win shares, 6.1 WAR. Best fielder | Addison Russell, Cubs.

Most similar rookie season | Hanley Ramirez, 2003

AGE R HR RBI AVG OBP SLG
Seager 22 105 26 72 .308 .365 .512
Ramirez 22 119 17 59 .292 .353 .480

The outfield is young, with a combined one All-Star appearance, thanks to three usually great players who didn’t make the cut.

Left field | Christian Yelich, Marlins. 21 home runs, 98 RBIs, .298 average, .376 on-base, .483 slugging, 21 win shares, 5.3 WAR. Yelich, who made one critic “eat crow,” beats out Ryan Braun. Best fielder | Adam Duvall, Reds.

Center field | Odubel Herrera, Phillies. 15 home runs, 49 RBIs, .286 average, .361 on-base, .420 slugging, 25 stolen bases, 24 win shares, 4.2 WAR. Andrew McCutchen had a surprisingly bad season. Best fielder | Billy Hamilton, Reds.

Right field | Stephen Piscotty, Cardinals. 22 home runs, 85 RBIs, .273 average, .343 on-base, .457 slugging, 12 HBPs, 22 win shares, 2.9 WAR. Bryce Harper hit .286/.406/.714 with nine home runs in April. Then the Cubs walked him 13 times in a four-game series, six in one game, three of those intentionally. He never recovered, hitting.235/.367/.392 with 15 home runs the rest of the season. Best fielder | Jason Heyward, Cubs.

Starting rotation |

1. Max Scherzer, Nationals. 20-7, 2.96 ERA, 284 strikeouts and 56 walks in 228.1 innings, 20 win shares, 6.2 WAR. He struck out 20 against the Tigers on May 11, tying a major league record, but it was the least impressive 20-strikeout game in history.

2. Johnny Cueto, Giants. 18-5, 2.79 ERA, 198 strikeouts and 45 walks in 219.2 innings, five complete games, 19 win shares, 5.6 WAR. The Royals did not invite him to their White House visit in July.

3. Jon Lester, Cubs. 19-5, 2.44 ERA, 197 strikeouts and 52 walks in 202.2 innings, 18 win shares, 5.3 WAR. He is the likely Cy Young Award winner.

4. Tanner Roark, Nationals. 16-10, 2.83 ERA, 173 strikeouts and 73 walks in 210 innings, 13 HBPs, 17 win shares, 5.5 WAR. He was lucky, outperforming his Fielding Independent Pitching (FIP) by almost a run — 2.83 ERA vs. 3.79 FIP.

5. Madison Bumgarner, Giants. 15-9, 2.74 ERA, 251 strikeouts and 54 walks in 226.2 innings, 19 win shares, 5.0 WAR. Stop looking at him.

6. Noah Syndergaard, Mets
7. Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers
8. Kyle Hendricks, Cubs
9. Carlos Martinez, Cardinals

Relievers |

Kenley Jansen, Dodgers. 3-2, 1.83 ERA, 47 saves, 104 strikeouts and 11 walks in 68.2 innings, 17 win shares, 2.5 WAR. He’s a free agent after the season.

Mark Melancon, Pirates-Nationals. 2-2, 1.64 ERA, 47 saves, 65 strikeouts and 12 walks in 71.1 innings, 16 win shares, 2.8 WAR. Another free agent.

  1. Robinson played first base during his rookie season and second base for most of his career, but he also played 249 games at third.
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