Mike TroutThe Astros and Blue Jays, the two most improved teams in the American League, lead my awards ballot and All-Star team.

The Astros, who won 16 more games than last season, take home three awards — and all of them were close calls. The Blue Jays, who were 10 games better than last season, put three players on the All-Star team — two from the best offense in the majors.

Babe Ruth Award | Mike Trout, Angels. 41 home runs, 90 RBIs, .299 average, .402 on-base, .590 slugging, 104 runs, 42 win shares, 9.4 WAR. 24 years old and the league’s best player for four straight seasons.

This was Josh Donaldson’s award through August. Then Trout slugged .648 with eight home runs in September and October.

2. Josh Donaldson, Blue Jays
3. Lorenzo Cain, Royals
4. Manny Machado, Orioles
5. Dallas Keuchel, Astros

Pee Wee Reese Award (or Teammate of the Year) | Josh Donaldson, Blue Jays. 41 home runs, 123 RBIs, .297 average, .371 on-base, .568 slugging, 122 runs, 41 doubles, 32 win shares, 8.8 WAR.

Teammate of the Year is often what writers really mean when they vote for MVP.

Josh Donaldson will probably win the MVP award, because he was the second-best player in the league and his team made the playoffs, while Mike Trout’s Angels did not. Even better, Donaldson fits the New Teammate narrative — great player joins new team, which makes big improvement, usually winning its division.

The Athletics traded Donaldson to the Blue Jays during the offseason. He led the league in RBIs and runs. Toronto made the playoffs for the first time since 1993.

Players who won the MVP award in their first year with a new team, which won its division (since 1969):

Rollie Fingers, 1981
Willie Hernandez, 1984
Kirk Gibson, 1988
Terry Pendleton, 1991
Ichiro, 2001
Vladimir Guerrero, 2004

Walter Johnson Award | Dallas Keuchel, Astros. 20-8, 2.48 ERA, 216 strikeouts and 51 walks in 232 innings, 3 complete games, 2 shutouts, 22 win shares, 7.2 WAR.

Jackie Robinson Award | Carlos Correa, Astros. 22 home runs, 68 RBIs, .279 average, .345 on-base, .512 slugging, 18 win shares, 4.1 WAR.

Houston’s Carlos Correa and Cleveland’s Francisco Lindor are both 21-year-old shortstops from Puerto Rico. Correa made his major league debut on June 8, Lindor six days later. Both played in less than 100 games — neither would be good Rookie of the Year candidate in any other season.

Correa is the better hitter, Lindor the better fielder.

I’ll take Correa, who hit 22 home runs in the middle of a pennant race.

Connie Mack Award | A.J. Hinch, Astros. 86-76. General manager Jeff Luhnow and his analytics team get most the credit for Houston’s success. But it’s Hinch who has the Astros ahead of schedule.

2. John Gibbons, Blue Jays
3. Ned Yost, Royals

Tommy John Award (or Comeback Player of the Year) | Alex Rodriguez, Yankees. 33 home runs, 86 RBIs, .250 average, .356 on-base, .486 slugging, 15 win shares, 3.0 WAR.

Rodriguez had arthroscopic surgery on his left hip in January 2013, which delayed his season debut until Aug. 5 — the same day Major League Baseball suspended him for the 2014 season for “his use and possession of numerous forms of prohibited performance-enhancing substances, including Testosterone and human Growth Hormone, over the course of multiple years” and “attempting to cover-up his violations of the Program by engaging in a course of conduct intended to obstruct and frustrate the Office of the Commissioner’s investigation.”

In February, Rodriguez released a hand-written apology to “Major League Baseball, the Yankees, the Steinbrenner family, the Players Association and you, the fans.”

The 40-year-old has since passed Willie Mays for fourth on the all-time home run list and reached three major milestones — 3,000 hits, 2,000 runs and 2,000 RBIs.

Catcher | Brian McCann, Yankees. 26 home runs, 94 RBIs, .232 average, .320 on-base, .437 slugging, 11 HBPs, 21 win shares, 2.7 WAR. Best fielder | Salvador Perez, Royals.

First base | Miguel Cabrera, Tigers. 18 home runs, 76 RBIs, .338 average, .440 on-base, .534 slugging, 27 win shares, 5.2 WAR. Cabrera missed six weeks in July and August with a left calf strain, then returned to win his fourth batting title in five seasons. Best fielder | Mark Teixeira, Yankees.

2. Chris Davis, Orioles

Second base | Jose Altuve, Astros. 15 home runs, 66 RBIs, .313 average, .353 on-base, .459 slugging, 200 hits, 40 doubles, 38 stolen bases, 26 win shares, 4.5 WAR. Best fielder | Ian Kinsler, Tigers.

2. Ian Kinsler, Tigers

Third base | Josh Donaldson, Blue Jays. 41 home runs, 123 RBIs, .297 average, .371 on-base, .568 slugging, 122 runs, 41 doubles, 32 win shares, 8.8 WAR. Best fielder | Manny Machado, Orioles.

2. Manny Machado, Orioles

Shortstop | Xander Bogaerts, Red Sox. 7 home runs, 81 RBIs, .320 average, .355 on-base, .421 slugging, 22 win shares, 4.6 WAR. Best fielder | Elvis Andrus, Rangers.

Left field | Michael Brantley, Cleveland. 15 home runs, 84 RBIs, .310 average, .379 on-base, .480 slugging, 45 doubles, 21 win shares, 3.4 WAR. Best fielder | Alex Gordon, Royals.

Center field | Mike Trout, Angels. 41 home runs, 90 RBIs, .299 average, .402 on-base, .590 slugging, 104 runs, 42 win shares, 9.4 WAR. Best fielder | Kevin Kiermaier, Rays.

2. Lorenzo Cain, Royals
3. Kevin Kiermaier, Rays
4. Mookie Betts, Red Sox

Right field | J.D. Martinez, Tigers. 38 home runs, 102 RBIs, .282 average, .344 on-base, .535 slugging, 26 win shares, 5.0 WAR. Best fielder | Kole Calhoun, Angels.

2. Nelson Cruz, Mariners
3. Jose Bautista, Blue Jays

Designated hitter | Edwin Encarnacion, Blue Jays. 39 home runs, 111 RBIs, .277 average, .372 on-base, .557 slugging, 24 win shares, 4.7 WAR.

Starting rotation |

1. Dallas Keuchel, Astros. 20-8, 2.48 ERA, 216 strikeouts and 51 walks in 232 innings, 3 complete games, 2 shutouts, 22 win shares, 7.2 WAR. He was 15-0 with a 1.46 ERA at Minute Maid Park.

2. Dave Price, Tigers-Blue Jays. 18-5, 2.45 ERA, 225 strikeouts and 47 walks in 220.1 innings, 3 complete games, 1 shutout, 19 win shares, 6.0 WAR. He was 9-4 with a 2.53 ERA with the Tigers and 9-1 with a 2.30 ERA with the Blue Jays.

Dave Dombrowski — who was fired by the Tigers as president and general manager in August — traded Price to the Blue Jays, Yoenis Cespedes to the Mets and Joakim Soria to the Pirates before his exit. The Tigers missed the playoffs for the first time since 2010, but Dombrowski helped three other teams reach the postseason.

3. Sonny Gray, Athletics. 14-7, 2.73 ERA, 169 strikeouts and 59 walks in 208 innings, 3 complete games, 2 shutouts, 13 wild pitches, 16 win shares, 5.8 WAR.

4. Corey Kluber, Cleveland. 9-16, 3.49 ERA, 245 strikeouts and 45 walks in 222 innings, four complete games, 11 HBPs, 14 win shares, 4.2 WAR. He had the worst run support in the league — 3.31 runs per game.

5. Chris Archer, Rays. 12-13, 3.23 ERA, 252 strikeouts and 66 walks in 212 innings, 1 complete game, 1 shutout, 13 wild pitches, 14 win shares, 4.3 WAR.

6. Chris Sale, White Sox
7. Carlos Quintana, White Sox

Reliever | Wade Davis, Royals. 8-1, 0.94 ERA, 17 saves, 18 holds, 78 strikeouts and 20 walks in 67.1 innings, 19 win shares, 3.4 WAR.

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